Since opening for the 2020 season on May 11, Montcalm Golf Club in Enfield, New Hampshire continues to enrich the golfing experience for players of all levels. With several new enhancements, including a new practice and training facility, a new golf school, and a variety of membership packages, you couldn’t pick a better time to join or play at Montcalm! New to our course? Get a hole-by-hole tour.

New Golf Practice & Training Facility 

Montcalm’s new training and practice venue includes 40 full swing natural grass hitting stations, 20 PGA Tour-approved Turf Hound hitting stations, a bentgrass putting and chipping green, as well as beautifully-groomed practice bunkers and pitching areas. Our new 5,800 square foot putting green is expected to be ready for use by early July.

New Golf School

Looking to improve your game? Montcalm offers one- and two-day golf schools headed by Montcalm Director of Golf/Head Professional Steve Rogers. Rogers, a 26-year member of the PGA, has a rich history of instruction at some of the finest facilities in the country from Newport (RI) Country Club to PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, home of the “Killer Golf Schools,” to current cutting edge PGA proving ground Joey D Golf in Jupiter, Florida. Visit our website to learn more about our golf school.

New Membership Opportunities

Montcalm offers memberships designed to meet the varying needs of players, including:

  • Family
  • Non-Resident Family
  • Single
  • Non-Resident Single
  • NEW: Young Adult (ages 16-23)

Visit us online for membership classifications and pricing. 

New Golf Carts

In an effort to further enhance the golfer experience at Montcalm, we purchased a brand-new fleet of 60 Club Car Tempo golf carts with Visage, a GPS and mobile information system. Who’s ready to take one of these for a spin?

Expanded Food Offerings

All of our food is now prepared by our own team, allowing us to use the freshest ingredients. We switch out our menus regularly to expand our offerings.

Stay in Touch With Us

Be sure to get the latest information on upcoming events and activities at Montcalm Golf Club by following on Facebook and joining our mailing list. Join Our E List!

Award-Winning Golf in Northern NH

With 6,829 yards of rolling velvet fairways and greens surrounded by outstanding views, there’s nothing quite like golfing at Montcalm. It continually receives rave reviews from members and guests who enjoy the complete privacy and exquisite beauty that is Montcalm. Montcalm Golf Club is conveniently located off of I-89, Exit 15 at 2 Smith Pond Road in Enfield, NH. Call us at (603) 448-5665 or visit us online to schedule a tee time or arrange a tour of our facility.

Each of these one-page documents explain a major change going into effect on January 1, 2020. Each individual paper describes:

  • The current USGA Handicap System policy,
  • The Rule change and
  • The reasons for the change.The following papers are included:

Topic

  1. 1  Course Rating and Slope Rating
  2. 2  Number of Scores Required to Obtain a Handicap Index
  3. 3  Basis of Handicap Index Calculation
  4. 4  Limit on Upward Movement of a Handicap Index (Cap)
  5. 5  Exceptional Score Reduction (ESR)
  6. 6  Playing Conditions Calculation (PCC)
  7. 7  Frequency of Handicap Index Updates
  8. 8  Maximum Handicap Index
  9. 9  Importance and Determination of Par
  10. 10  Course Handicap Calculation and Application
  11. 11  Playing Handicap Calculation and Application
  12. 12  Maximum Hole Score for Handicap Purposes (Net Double Bogey)
  13. 13  Treatment of Nine-Hole Scores

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 1. Course Rating and Slope Rating

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): The USGA Course Rating System is the foundation of the USGA Handicap System and allows each player’s Handicap Index to be transported from one course to another. The system is widely used around the world but not by all current handicapping systems.

Rule Change for 2020: The USGA Course Rating System will be referred to as “The Course Rating System” and will join “The Rules of Handicapping” to form the World Handicap System.

Reasons for Change:

  •   The Course Rating System will be implemented by National Associations and allow a player’s Handicap Index to be from course to course and country to country.
  •   To enable acceptable scores made at any rated golf course in the world to be submitted for handicap purposes.

o For those who travel internationally, this will be a welcomed change as scores made outside the U.S. will easily be factored into their Handicap Index calculation.

To provide an accurate and consistent measure of the difficulty of a golf course by ensuring that playing length and obstacle factors are evaluated the same way worldwide.

o Since golf courses are rated by qualified teams trained by Authorized Associations, the integrity of the World Handicap System will be maintained.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 2. Number of Scores Required to Obtain a Handicap Index

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): A Handicap Index is issued to a player after five 18-hole scores are submitted and a revision takes place.

Scores can be made up of any combination of 9-hole and 18-hole scores.

A Handicap Index is revised on the 1st and 15th of each month.
Rule Change for 2020: A Handicap Index will be issued to a player after three 18-hole scores

are submitted and a revision takes place.

  •   Scores can be made up of any combination of 9-hole and 18-hole scores.
  •   Revisions will be daily, so a player’s Handicap Index will become active the day after their third 18-hole score is submitted.Reasons for Change:

One of the key principles of the World Handicap System is to enable as many golfers as possible the opportunity to establish and maintain a Handicap Index.

o By requiring fewer scores, players who only play sporadically may be more likely to obtain a Handicap Index.

Statistics show that players with a Handicap Index play more rounds of golf, so making it easier to get a Handicap Index can help increase participation.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 3. Basis of Handicap Index Calculation

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): When a score is submitted, it is converted to a Handicap Differential based on the Course Rating and Slope Rating of the tees that were played.

A Handicap Index is then calculated by averaging a player’s 10 best Handicap Differentials out of their most recent 20.

  •   The resulting average is then multiplied by .96 – also referred to as the “bonus for excellence.”
  •   If a player has submitted two or more Tournament Scores (T-scores) within the past 12- months, and two of those Handicap Differentials are 3.0 strokes below their Handicap Index as calculated from the steps above, then an additional reduction might apply.Rule Change for 2020: When a score is submitted, it will be converted to a Score Differential based on the Course Rating and Slope Rating of the tees that were played. In addition, a Playing Conditions Calculation will be included to account for any abnormal course or weather conditions.A Handicap Index will then be calculated by averaging a player’s 8 best Score Differentials out of their most recent 20.
    •   A Soft Cap and Hard Cap will be included in the calculation to limit the extreme upward movement of a Handicap Index within a 12-month period.
    •   An Exceptional Score Reduction will take place when a player submits a score that produces a Score Differential that is 7.0 strokes or more below their Handicap Index.Reasons for Change:

Moving to an 8 of 20 system will allow for greater responsiveness to good scores and eliminate the need for a bonus for excellence – which is often difficult to explain.

o Since players with a higher Handicap Index tend to have more fluctuation within their Scoring Records, using 8 of 20 will allow their better scores to weigh more heavily and create more equity across all Handicap Index ranges.

  •   Including a Playing Conditions Calculation will ensure that each Score Differential is reflective of a player’s performance in a given round.
  •   Limiting the extreme upward movement of a Handicap Index will ensure that a temporary loss of form does not cause a player’s Handicap Index to move too far from their demonstrated ability.
  •   The Exceptional Score Reduction procedure is designed to be intuitive by evaluating all scores as opposed to just “T-scores.”
  •   Incorporating these safeguards will add integrity to the system and support Handicap Committees by ensuring the accuracy of each member’s Handicap Index.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 4. Limit of Upward Movement of a Handicap Index (Cap)

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020)U: There is no restriction on the upward movement of a Handicap Index built into the calculation.

The Handicap Committee at a golf club is responsible for monitoring extreme upward movement of any members’ Handicap Index and make modifications where appropriate.

URule Change for 2020U: A “soft cap” and “hard cap” will be included within the Handicap Index calculation.

  •   The soft cap will suppress the upward movement of a Handicap Index by 50 percent if a 3.0 stroke increase takes place within 12 months.
  •   The hard cap will restrict upward movement if, after the application of the soft cap, a 5.0 stroke increase takes place within 12 months.UReasons for Change:

A new term, “Low Handicap Index” will be included within the Rules of Handicapping and will be made visible to players. This value will serve as the baseline for the soft cap and hard cap procedures.

o A Low Handicap Index will be established once a player has at least 20 acceptable scores in their scoring record. At this point, the soft cap and hard cap procedures will begin taking effect.

o A newly determined Low Handicap Index will be considered each time an acceptable score is submitted and a Handicap Index is updated.

  •   There is no limit on the amount by which a player’s Handicap Index can decrease, but the soft cap and hard cap will ensure that a temporary loss of form does not cause a player’s Handicap Index to increase to a level inconsistent with their demonstrated ability.
  •   The automatic calculation will prevent extreme upward movement of a Handicap Index, as well as assist Handicap Committees as an anti-abuse safeguard.

o When special circumstances exist, such as injury, the Handicap Committee will have the ability to override the soft cap or hard cap.

This procedure will favor the consistent player, as players who have significant volatility in their scoring history over a 12-month period will be impacted by it more often.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 5. Exceptional Score Reduction (ESR)

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): When a player submits two or more Tournament Scores (T-scores) within a 12-month period that are at least 3.0 strokes better than their Handicap Index, they are eligible for an automatic Handicap Index reduction.

The amount of the reduction is determined by the number of T-scores submitted by a player within the last 12-months, as well as the difference between the Handicap Index and the average of the two best T-score Handicap Differentials.

Rule Change for 2020: When a player submits a score that produces a Score Differential of 7.0 strokes or more below their Handicap Index, they will be subject to an Exceptional Score Reduction.

  •   When the Score Differential is between 7.0 and 9.9 strokes below their current Handicap Index, a -1.0 reduction is applied to the most recent 20 score differentials. When the Score Differential is 10.0 strokes or more below their Handicap Index, a -2.0 reduction is applied to the most recent 20 score differentials.
  •   Scores submitted after the exceptional score will not contain the -1.0 or -2.0 adjustment (unless they are also exceptional), which will allow reduction to gradually work itself out of a Scoring Record.Reasons for Change:

To simplify the automatic reduction process.

o Section 10-3 of “The USGA Handicap System” is nearly five pages long. Exceptional Score Reduction will be covered in less than one page in the Rules of Handicapping.

o This new procedure will be straightforward and intuitive. When a player submits an exceptional score, they will receive an automatic adjustment of -1.0 or -2.0.

  •   Handicap research shows that players who have shot 7.0 strokes below their Handicap Index are more likely to do so again in the future.
  •   Under the USGA Handicap System, only rounds played in events designated by the Committee as T-scores can lead to an automatic reduction.

o There has been confusion as to which competitions should receive the T-score designation, and as a result it has been applied inconsistently.

o By considering all scores in the Exceptional Score Reduction procedure, a player’s Handicap Index will be more responsive to exceptional performances in competitive and recreational play.

Since T-scores under the USGA Handicap System are retained for 12-months and compared to the Handicap Index at each revision, it is possible for T-scores that were not exceptional at the time they were made to become exceptional at a later date. This will no longer take place in 2020.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 6. Playing Conditions Calculation (PCC)

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): There is no calculation or adjustment to account for abnormal course or weather conditions.

Rule Change for 2020: When abnormal course or weather conditions cause scores to be unusually high or low on a given day, a “Playing Conditions Calculation” will adjust Score Differentials to better reflect a player’s actual performance. The “PCC” is:

  •  An automatic procedure by the computation service that compares the scores submitted on the day against expected scoring patterns,
  •  Conservative in nature and applied in integer values, and
  •  Applied in the Score Differential calculation of all players – even those who submit theirscore(s) on a later date.Reasons for Change:

To provide a mechanism that allows a better assessment of the difficulty of a course on a particular day.

o Golf is an outdoor sport with many factors that can impact scoring (weather, rough height, hole locations, etc.).

» A score of 90 made under challenging conditions could be a more impressive performance than an 88 under normal conditions – and incorporating a Playing Conditions Calculation allows this to be represented.

  •   This is one of the more modern features of the system, but a similar calculation has been used successfully in other parts of the world.
  •   The Playing Conditions Calculation will also be used to identify if the Course Rating of a golf course needs to be reviewed by the local Authorized Golf Association.

o The PCC is designed to be conservative, so if an adjustment is taking place 4-5 days a week, then the Course Rating may not be accurately representing the difficulty of the golf course.

o The ability to identify such courses will provide enhanced integrity to the system.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 7. Frequency of Handicap Index Updates

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): Following the National Revision Schedule, a player’s Handicap Index is updated on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Rule Change for 2020: A player’s Handicap Index will update daily, provided that the player submitted a score the day before. On days where the player does not submit a score, no update will take place.

Reasons for Change:

To provide players with a more responsive and up-to-date Handicap Index.
o Under the current system, a newly submitted score may have to wait up to two

weeks before it’s factored into the player’s Handicap Index calculation.  To streamline the process of establishing a Handicap Index.

o After a player submits their third acceptable 18-hole score (made up of any combination of 9-hole and 18-hole rounds), they will be issued a Handicap Index the next day.

To encourage players to submit scores as soon as practicable, preferably before midnight on the day of play.

o Since the Playing Conditions Calculation will use scores submitted at a course each day, it is crucial that scores are posted on the same day of play.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 8. Maximum Handicap Index

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020)U: The maximum Handicap Index is 36.4 for men and 40.4 for women.

URule Change for 2020U: The maximum Handicap Index for all golfers will be 54.0, regardless of gender.

UReasons for Change:

  •   To make the game more welcoming to new players and incentivize beginners toestablish and maintain a Handicap Index.
  •   To provide all players with a more precise measure of their demonstrated ability and allow players of all skill levels to track their progress in the game.
  •   By encouraging novice and recreational players to get a Handicap Index, they’ll be provided with opportunities to learn about the Rules of Handicapping.

o Although the number of players with a Handicap Index at or above the current maximums of 36.4 and 40.4 is relatively small, many golfers who currently play but do not have a Handicap Index would be above those limits.

  •   Statistics show that players with a Handicap Index play more rounds of golf. Therefore, making the system more welcoming can help grow the game and create a more sustainable future.
  •   Although the maximum Handicap Index will be 54.0, the Committee in charge of the Competition can set a lower maximum limit for entry or use in competitions.

o If the desire is to have players with similar abilities competing against each other, the Committee can also divide the competition into flights.

Although some are concerned that increasing the maximum Handicap Index may lead to handicap manipulation, safeguards exist within the Handicap Index calculation to minimize the potential for it (“Cap” – Rule 5.8; “Exceptional Score Reduction” – Rule 5.9; “Handicap Review” – Appendix D).

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 9. Importance and Determination of Par

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): Par has little significance because a Course Handicap represents the number of strokes a player receives in order to play down to the Course Rating of the tees being played – not par.

Rule Change for 2020: Par will have an important role within the World Handicap System, requiring par values to be more precise. Golf courses fall within the jurisdiction of the Authorized Golf Association, who has the final determination of par based on the following guidelines:

Par

Men

Women

3 Up to 260 yards 4 240 to 490 yards 5 450 to 710 yards 6 670 yards and up

Up to 220 yards 200 to 420 yards 370 to 600 yards 570 yards and up

 When determining Par, the Authorized Golf Association will also consider how the hole is designed to be played and effective playing length factors such as elevation, doglegs and forced lay-ups.

o For example, if an uphill hole falls within the par 5 yardage guidelines for men from all tees except the most forward set, which is 435 yards, that hole may also be designated as a par 5 from the forward tees.

Reasons for Change:

The Course Handicap calculation will include a Course Rating minus Par adjustment, which will enable a Course Handicap to represent the number of strokes a player receives to play down to the Par of the tees being played.

o As a result, as long as players are competing from tees with the same Pars, no additional adjustment is needed.

o If players are competing from tees with different Pars, the player(s) competing from the tees with higher Par must add the difference in Par to their Course Handicap.

  •   The maximum hole score for handicap purposes will be a “Net Double Bogey,” equal to Par + 2 + any handicap strokes the player receives. For this adjustment to be accurate, Par values must be correct.
  •   When a player does not play a hole, “Net Par” must be recorded as their score for the hole. Net Par is equal to Par + any handicap strokes the player receives.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 10. Course Handicap Calculation and Application

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020)U: A Course Handicap represents the number of strokes a player receives in relation to the UCourse RatingU of the tees being played. The formula is:

Course Handicap = Handicap Index x Slope Rating / 113.

URule Change for 2020U: A Course Handicap will represent the number of strokes a player receives in relation to the UParU of the tees being played. The formula will include a Course Rating minus Par adjustment:

Course Handicap = Handicap Index × (Slope Rating ÷ 113) + (Course Rating – Par) UReasons for Change:

Under the USGA Handicap System, when players compete from different tees, a Course Handicap adjustment based on the Course Rating difference must take place to make the game fair.

o This adjustment is necessary because players competing from different tees are competing with different benchmarks (different Course Ratings).

o This adjustment, identified and explained in Section 3-5, has generated confusion and there have been challenges with its implementation over the years.

  •   Applying Course Rating minus Par within the Course Handicap calculation will allow players to compete from different tees without any adjustment – unless a difference in Par exists.
  •   Under the USGA Handicap System, it is common for Course Handicap values to change very little from tee to tee.

o Confusion exists because the Course Handicap value only accounts for the number of strokes needed to play to the respective Course Rating.

  •   Beginning in 2020, Course Handicap values will change more from tee to tee, as they will represent the number of strokes to play to Par.
  •   Par is a term that resonates with golfers, so setting Par as the benchmark for a Course Handicap adds simplicity to handicapping.

o Players will be able to determine their Target Scores (the score they’ll shoot if they play to their handicap) by simply adding their Course Handicap + Par.

A score of Net Par will be used for holes not played, and the maximum hole score for handicap purposes will be a Net Double Bogey. Having a Course Handicap that is relative to Par will ensure that the correct number of strokes are received and applied for both procedures.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 11. Playing Handicap Calculation and Application

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020)U: When a player’s Course Handicap is adjusted based on the application of a Handicap Allowance or other term(s) of a competition, the resulting value is not defined and is still referred to as a Course Handicap.

URule Change for 2020U: The term “Playing Handicap” will be introduced within the Rules of Handicapping and will represent the number of strokes a player receives in a competition. The following formula will be used to determine a Playing Handicap:

Playing Handicap = Course Handicap x Handicap Allowance

If players are competing from tees with different Pars, then the player(s) competing from the tees with the higher Par will receive an additional stroke(s) based on the difference.

UReasons for Change:
By introducing the term Playing Handicap, there will be a clear distinction between two

key Rules of Handicapping definitions, where both serve specific purposes:
o A Course Handicap will be used to adjust individual hole scores (Net Double

Bogey and Net Par procedures).

o Playing Handicaps will be used for net competition purposes – including determining the results and winner(s).

Under the current system, confusion exists because there is only one defined term that often represents two different values.

o For example – A player with a Course Handicap of 21 participating in a four-ball stroke play competition using the recommended Handicap Allowance of 85% will receive 18 strokes during the round. In 2020, the 18 strokes received will be their Playing Handicap.

The defined term Playing Handicap will be intuitive and ensure that both terms are applied properly.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 12. Maximum Hole Score for Handicap Purposes (Net Double Bogey)

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020)U: The maximum hole score for handicap purposes is based on a player’s Course Handicap and the following Equitable Stroke control (ESC) table:

Course Handicap

Maximum Score on any Hole

9 or less 10 through 19 20 through 29 30 through 39 40 or more

Double Bogey 7
8
9
10

URule Change for 2020U: The maximum hole score for each player will be limited to a Net Double Bogey, calculated as follows:

Double Bogey + handicap strokes a player receives (or gives) based on their Course Handicap

(“or gives” only applies to plus handicap players)

Reasons for Change
The Net Double Bogey adjustment is more consistent from hole to hole than the ESC

procedure.

o For example – Using the ESC procedure, a player with a Course Handicap of 21 would have the same maximum score (8) on each hole – regardless of the Par or difficulty of the hole.

o By factoring in Par and Stroke Index values under the Net Double Bogey procedure, adjusted hole scores will be more precise and reflective of each player’s demonstrated ability.

» This is a more personal assessment compared to the grouping together of Course Handicap ranges.

  • While this is a change for all who have used the USGA Handicap System, Net Double Bogey has been used successfully in many parts of the world – as it is the equivalent to zero points in the Net Stableford format of play.
  • The 2019 “Rules of Golf” introduced the maximum score form of stroke play, and Net Double Bogey was included as a recommended maximum score.oWhenNetDoubleBogeyisthemaximumscoresetbytheCommittee,no adjustments are necessary for handicap purposes.

USGA Handicap System to World Handicap System – Change Summary 13. Treatment of Nine-Hole Scores

USGA Handicap System (pre-2020): To submit a nine-hole score, a player must play 7 to 12 holes under the Rules of Golf. When 13 or more holes are played, the score submitted qualifies as an 18-hole score.

A player can have a Handicap Index and/or a nine-hole Handicap Index (N).

  •   For players with a Handicap Index, nine-hole scores are combined in the order that they are received and used to produce an 18-hole Handicap Differential.
  •   For players with a nine-hole Handicap Index (N), the most recent 20 nine-hole Handicap Differentials are used in the calculation of their nine-hole Handicap Index (N).Rule Change for 2020: To submit a nine-hole score, a player must play 7 to 13 holes under the Rules of Golf. When 14 or more holes are played, the score submitted qualifies as an 18- hole score.
    •   For players with a Handicap Index, nine-hole scores are combined in the order that they are received and used to produce an 18-hole Score Differential.
    •   A nine-hole Handicap Index (N) will no longer exist. Reasons for Change:

To ensure that each player has one Handicap Index and one Scoring Record under the World Handicap System.

o Under the USGA Handicap System, a player can maintain both a Handicap Index and a Handicap Index (N).

The method for calculating a Handicap Index will be the same worldwide, and this applies whether a player submits all 9-hole scores, 18-hole scores, or a combination of both.

o A player’s Handicap Index will be interchangeable for both 9-hole and 18-hole play.

To enhance the integrity of the Handicap Index calculation.

o When a player with a nine-hole Handicap Index (N) competes in an 18-hole competition, doubling their nine-hole Handicap Index (N) is not always fair – as the player(s) doubling their nine-hole Handicap Index (N) are sometimes at a disadvantage and receive one or two fewer strokes than they would with an 18- hole Handicap Index.

Source: https://www.whs.com/

Beginning in 2020 a brand-new set of Rules for Handicapping will be introduced globally

  1. Your Handicap Index may change.

    But that’s ok! Finally, players around the world will have an apples-to-apples handicap. Your new Handicap Index will be more responsive to good scores by averaging your eight best scores out of your most recent 20 (currently, it’s 10 out of 20 with a .96 multiplier). In short, your Handicap Index will be determined by your demonstrated ability and consistency of scores. In most cases for golfers in the U.S., it will change less than one stroke.

  2. You need to know your Course Handicap.

    In the new system, your Course Handicap will be the number of strokes needed to play to par. This will result in greater variance in that number and presents a change, as historically it has represented the number of strokes needed to play to the Course Rating. This is a good thing, as par is an easy number to remember. Target score for the day? Par plus Course Handicap. The Course Rating will now be inherent within the calculation to be more intuitive and account for competing from different tees.

  3. Net Double Bogey.

    The maximum hole score for each player will be limited to a Net Double Bogey. This adjustment is more consistent from hole to hole than the Equitable Stroke Control procedure. Net Double Bogey is already used in many other parts of the world and the calculation is simple: Par + 2 + any handicap strokes you receive.

  4. Your Handicap Index will be revised daily.

    One way that handicapping is being modernized is a player’s Handicap Index will update daily (which will provide a fairer indication of a player’s ability in the moment), if the player submitted a score the day before. On days where the player does not submit a score, no update will take place.

  5. Safeguards in the new system.

    The new system will limit extreme upward movement of a Handicap Index, automatically and immediately reduce a Handicap Index when an exceptional score of at least 7 strokes better is posted, and account for abnormal course or weather conditions to ensure that scores reflect when a course plays significantly different than its established Course Rating and Slope Rating.

    These safeguards help maintain accuracy of a Handicap Index, greater integrity within the system and promote fun and fair play for golfers of all abilities.

Source: https://www.whs.com/

The Montcalm Golf Club, one of New England’s premier golf experiences located in Enfield, New Hampshire, will open its golf course May 11 in response to the Governor’s COVID-19, 2.0 procedural updates announced May 1. To ensure safety, the course will introduce new operating procedures to keep members and New Hampshire residents safe, while also enforcing social distancing.

As part of the 2020 golf season, the award-winning, 6,829 yard Montcalm Golf Club will also introduce a new practice and training facility, a new golf school and a variety of membership packages. Non-members are welcome to preview the course, book a tee time to play a round of golf at their leisure and enroll in golf school.

“These are unprecedented times for us all and we know how eager everyone is to get outside. We’re excited to welcome members as well as new golfers and get the season underway,” said Steve Rogers, Montcalm Golf Club’s Director of Golf.  “Our commitment is to offer a safe, ‘inclusive yet exclusive’ experience to golfers of all skill sets and with new ownership invested in providing a best-in-class venue, we are eager to welcome the community to enjoy golf at our place of calm and tranquility.”

The owners, who recently acquired Montcalm (last summer), have enhanced the Club’s amenities with a new training and practice venue that includes 40 Full Swing natural grass hitting stations, 20 PGA Tour approved Turf Hound hitting stations, bent grass putting and chipping green, as well as beautifully groomed practice bunkers and pitching areas. A new 7,000 + square foot putting green is also being installed for 2020 which will be ready for use by June 15. Montcalm also has 60 new Club Car Tempo golf carts with Visage (GPS and mobile information system).

Montcalm’s new golf school offers one and two-day sessions (in June, July and August) and includes video analysis, instruction, unlimited practice and golf, club storage, breakfast and lunch. In addition there are weekly golf clinics for men (Wednesdays, 9:00 a.m.), women (Thursdays, 9:00 a.m.) and juniors (Saturdays, 9:00 a.m.).

Headed by Rogers, a 26 year member of the PGA who has a rich history of Instruction at some of the finest facilities in the country from Newport (RI) Country Club to PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, home of the “Killer Golf Schools,” to current cutting edge PGA proving ground Joey D Golf in Jupiter, Florida.

Situated between the Green Mountain National Forest and the White Mountain National Forest in the Upper Valley section of the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region, Montcalm Golf Club has outstanding panoramic mountain views of Killington, Vermont’s Green Mountains and Mt. Ascutney, as well as rolling hills of velvet green fairways and greens.

Montcalm Golf Club is conveniently located off of I 89 Exit 15 – 2 Smith Pond Rd. Enfield, NH 03748.

For more information: call 603-448-5665 or visit the website: https://montcalmgolfclub.com.

 

 

Source: The Golf Content Network

9 ways to pretend like it’s actually still Masters week

This is a sad, sad week for golf fans everywhere. But with the announcement of new Masters dates, we can take comfort in the fact that a 2020 Masters Tournament will likely still happen— sans azaleas. In the meantime, reruns and simulations can only get us so far, so check out this list of other ways to pretend like it’s still Masters week.

1. Pick a day to fully unplug from all your devices and strictly watch a rerun from your favorite Masters year.

2. Begin all of your Zoom calls and Facetimes with the phrase “Hello Friends.”

3. Make your own champions dinner with Tiger’s would-be selections. Since we didn’t get the final verdict on the milkshakes, I’d just go ahead and assume they’re included—we deserve that at leas

4. Go on a drive and when you pull back into your driveway, pretend it’s Magnolia Lane. It might be easier to use your imagination if you’re simultaneously playing the Masters theme song.

5. Make a mini-golf course around your house to mimic the Masters Par-3 Contest. If you have kids, dress them in all white outfits with green hats.

6. Wear whatever Masters stuff you have. Hat, polo, t-shirt, etc.—now is the time to deck yourself out in all of the gear.

7. Make an egg salad sandwich for lunch. I got this from Trader Joe’s, and while it’s not Augusta’s finest, it’s still pretty good. Pair with a chocolate chip cookie for good measure.

8. Own a green blazer? Maybe break that out over your everyday WFH hoodie this week.

9. Lucky enough to have any Masters cups? Drink exclusively from them all week.

SOURCE:  GOLF.COM

THE JOHN DALY EXPERIENCE AT MONTCALM GOLF CLUB

Enfield, New Hampshire – March 11, 2020 – Montcalm Golf Club announced today that world-renowned PGA and two-time major champion golfer John Daly will take center stage at Montcalm. This is John’s first-ever appearance on a New Hampshire course.

John will arrive at Montcalm on Saturday, August 22nd, beginning the day at 11 a.m. by conducting a clinic at Montcalm’s new state-of-the-art practice facility. Twenty-four golfers will enjoy the benefit of John’s vast experience in professional golf, and later join him on the links. Combined with Montcalm’s unparalleled scenic beauty and impeccable course conditions, this promises to be the golfing experience of a lifetime.

Montcalm Golf Club was rated as one of America’s Top 10 Best New Clubs by Golf Digest when it opened. It features 6,829 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72, and is conveniently located off Exit 15 on Interstate 89.

A portion of the day’s proceeds will be donated to several local charities.

Reserved tee times are available to Montcalm Golf Club members first. Registration will then open on a first-come, first-served basis beginning on March 15th. A limited amount of spectator tickets, which will include lunch, are available through the Montcalm Golf Club website at www.montcalmgolfclub.com.

This event promises to be one of the great golf highlights in New England during 2020.

Sponsorship opportunities and exclusive tee times are available by calling 603-448-5665.

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Learn how to turn back, not sway.
Let’s talk about hip turn. James Kinney, one of our Golf Digest Best Young Teachers and Director of Instruction at GolfTec Omaha, says that from the data GolfTec has collected, they’ve found lower handicap golfers have a more centered lower body at the top of the swing. Meaning, they don’t sway.
If you’re swaying off the ball, you’re moving yourself off of your starting position. The low point of your swing moves back when you sway back, so you’re going to have to shift forward to get your club to bottom out where the ball is. That takes a lot of timing, and is going to end up producing some ugly shots.
So, instead, Kinney says you should turn.
“When turning your hips, you are able to stay more centered over the golf ball in your backswing and the low point of your swing stays in the proper position, resulting in consistent contact.”
To practice turning, Kinney says to set up in a doorway. Have your back foot against the doorframe. When you make your lower body move back, your hip will hit the door fame if you’re swaying. If you’re turning, your hips are safe from hitting the frame.
Remember that feeling of turning when you’re on the course and your ball striking is going to get a whole lot more consistent.
SOURCE:  GolfDigest

6 Tips For Taking Your Kids Out On The Golf Course

How to keep your kids and the groups around you happy on the golf course

The thought of taking a group of kids out on the golf course is a lot more daunting than taking them to the driving range. But don’t let that fear deter you. There’s a way for kids to get around the course in a completely acceptable amount of time and not bother other groups in the process.

We spoke to Erika Larkin, one of our Golf Digest Best Young Teachers and the Director of Instruction at The Club at Creighton Farms in Aldie, Virginia.

Larkin not only teaches a lot of juniors, her two young children are also golfers. If anyone has some strategies on how to successfully navigate a group of juniors around a course without making the group behind you antsy, it’s her.

Here are Larkin’s 6 tips for taking kids out on the golf course:

Looks for lulls in the action

When you contact a course, be clear and tell them you’re coming with junior players and are looking for a quiet time. “The staff should know the ebbs and flows of traffic and be able to tell you a good time so you won’t be too rushed when playing with your kids,” says Larkin.

Keep it short

There’s no harm in walking off the course before 9 – in fact, it can be the best thing you can do. Larkin says, “Depending on the age of your golfers, 5 or 6 holes may be plenty. Finish when it’s still fun and it leaves your kids wanting more.”

Again, keep it short

But this time, keep the yardage short. Create your own course and tees as needed in the fairway. Larkin suggests, “6 to 8-year olds should play from 50-150 yards out on any given hole. Nine-11 year olds maybe 180-250 yards, and 12-13 year olds play from forward tees.” There’s no need for kids to go out and play full length courses. Making their own course for them within the larger course gives them the thrill of being on a course, while keeping it manageable.

Shawn Thorimbert @shawnthorimbert

Put your own game aside

As the adult, don’t plan on being able to think about your game. “Instead of focusing on your play, focus on setting a good example in attitude and etiquette,” says Larkin. “You’re filling the job more of a caddie than of a player for this round.”

Create time-saving games

“Add in fun twists like a “hand wedge” from the sand if they don’t get it out after two swings,” says Larkin. Or if they’re struggling on the green, instate a “magic putt.” Little things like this will keep it light and limit frustration for your group, and the groups around you.

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Don’t make it purely individual

Play a scramble or shamble. Introducing kids to the course doesn’t mean they have to play their own ball. “Playing a scramble will keep everyone moving and make the experience more team oriented,” says Larkin.

SOURCE: GolfDigest

Matthew Wolff, Joaquin Niemann, Cole Hammer among 20 golfers to follow in 2020

It’s obvious that Justin Thomas, Rory McIlroy, Brooks Koepka, Jon Rahm and Tiger Woods are five of the best golfers on the planet. Anyone who casually follows the game or engages in the sport can tell you that much. But what about when you step outside the star and superstar realm and get a little past the most obvious contenders in this sport?

What do you find at No. 50 in the world or No. 100 or even past that? With 2020 quickly approaching and another calendar year of golf on deck, I thought it would be fun to throw 20 names at you to watch in 2020. These are in no particular order in terms of ranking, but they’re 20 guys who have a chance to take a leap (or two leaps) into stardom in professional (or amateur) golf at the start of the new decade.

Let’s jump in.

1. Matthew Wolff: Probably the most famous of this group, and he already has a win. It might be unfair to include him on a list of folks you need to know more about because I don’t know how much you already know about him. But his intangibles are off the charts and probably more impressive than anyone else on here. I could not be more in.

2. Xinjun Xhang: Blew away the competition in the Korn Ferry Tour regular season this year. He’s already earned significantly more money in the fall than he did in his entire previous season on the PGA Tour combined.

3. Ben An: This is all you need to know about Ben An and his game.

Most golf beginners would begin their journey with a mid-iron or wedge, but An was the opposite as he started with one of the hardest clubs – the 1-iron. “I liked the 1-iron, that was the first club I used,” An said. “I remember it was a club with an old-school green colored grip. It just felt fun for me. I still remember it although I was very young then.” [PGA Tour]

4. Tom Lewis: The former stud amateur came over and won the Korn Ferry Tour Championship by five after his highest-ever finish at a major championship (T11 at The Open). Currently No. 53 in the world, which is his highest ranking ever.

5. Abraham Ancer: Stole the show at the Presidents Cup, but the reality is that he was playing quality golf long before that. Starred for a while at the 2019 Players Championship, finished second at The Northern Trust and top 10 in his last PGA Tour events of the fall.

6. Joaquin Niemann: Just turned 21 and has almost matched his age with his tee-to-green ranking on the PGA Tour. Certified stud.

7. Sungjae Im: The real breakout star of the Presidents Cup. Im might be a superstar, and he has the kind of game that’s going to go on and on and on and on. All the way up to 34th in the world, and I could see him in the top 20 this time next year.

No Laying Up

@NoLayingUp

Sungjae Im is an assassin. That guy might make $50 million on tour.

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8. Scottie Scheffler: There’s a little Spieth in there in terms of the amateur career and walking in the same footsteps. He doesn’t get the same shine Spieth ever did though, but he’s going to have a good, long career.

9. Corey Conners: The best ball-striker you’ve never heard of. He was ninth (!!) from tee to green last season.

10. Bernd Wiesberger: Did you know that Bernd Wiseberger is ranked ahead of Rickie Fowler in the Official World Golf Rankings? I bet you did not know this factual information.

11. Jazz Janewattananond: Introduced himself at the PGA Championship this spring, and likely played himself into the Masters by rising into the top 50 in the OWGR by Dec. 31. He’s currently No. 45 with two weeks to go (the top 50 on Dec. 31 get in).

12. Collin Morikawa: Elite iron player. I don’t know that he has the juice to hang with Wolff and Hovland long-term, but I’m extremely excited to watch him try and play his way into that.

13. Erik Van Rooyen: Come for the joggers, stay for one of the 50 best in the world.

14. Harry Higgs: Won on the Korn Ferry Tour last season and finished second at the Bermuda Championship this fall. He made $540,000 in the fall and is getting close to earning his 2021 card.

15. Robert Macintyre: Finished sixth (!) at The Open at Royal Portrush and had four other top-10 finishes to close out 2019. Still just 23 years old.

16. Takumi Kanaya: The No. 1 amateur in the world and the No. 222 player in the world overall. It’s not often you see that combination, but the 21-year-old is winning legit pro events and nearly even took the Australian Open a few weeks ago.

17. Viktor Hovland: Vegas shouldn’t even offer odds on him winning PGA Tour Rookie of the Year. Would be like letting Kyler Murray be a rookie next year.

18. Cole Hammer: Another Texas stud. Took down Wolff in the match-play portion of the NCAAs earlier in 2019 and is currently the No. 2 amateur in the world. Right amount of swag, tons of game and a great pedigree. Here for it.

19. Victor Perez: He’s won an official event in each of the last four calendar years. His fall was outstanding as he took the Dunhill Links and then nearly won in China (WGC event) and Turkey (European Tour Rolex Series event). Might be a Ryder Cup threat.

20. Justin Harding: He was the “one of these things is not like the other ones” golfer in the top 15 at Augusta in April. Last year was the first time in his career that he’s played all four of the majors in a calendar year, and he made the cut at three of the four including that impressive T12 at the Masters.

SOURCE:  CBSSports

Simple steps for getting your hands on right

I see a lot of amateurs approach the golf grip with a lot of tension. Many are holding the club too tightly. I notice it most when they try to waggle. The movement looks stiff and short.
To swing correctly, the right amount of grip pressure—and where you apply it—is important. You should feel the club being supported by the last three fingers of your left hand (above, left). Those fingers should grip the firmest. My longtime teacher, the late Stan Thirsk, used to remind me to keep the club in the fingers of my left hand and never let it slip into the palm.
In the right hand, the middle two fingers do most of the work. The forefinger and thumb of the right hand should feel relaxed. In fact, I’ve seen many great players, including Ben Hogan and Fred Couples, practice with those two fingers clear off the club (above, right).
Back to waggling. With softer grip pressure, your waggle will be looser and will help relax your hands and arms. During the swing, the right hand should be free enough to fire the clubhead through the hitting area.
When it comes to your golf grip, how tight is too tight? Here’s an exercise: Next time you practice, try backing off with your grip pressure until the club is almost falling out of your hands. Then firm it up just enough so you can control the club. That likely is your ideal grip pressure. Will it feel lighter? I’m guessing it will.
Tom Watson is a Golf Digest Teaching Professional.
SOURCE:  GolfDigest